Flying the Heavies

Much of these early “How To” blog articles are dedicated to understanding some of the basic knowledge required, as we progress I’ll include some additional and more advanced “How To” information.  At this time I’m assuming you are still very much new to the hobby of flight simulation.  If you have been following my “How To” articles, you may recall I’ve suggested on more than one occasion to start with the default Cessna (or some other single engine, light aircraft) and work your way up.  In my opinion, this is important and shouldn’t be overlooked.  As in the real world, an individual just doesn’t walk off the street and learns to fly a Boeing 747.  They start off in a much, much smaller aircraft.

The principle of flight is the same regardless of aircraft type.  Regardless if you are flying a Cessna 172 or a Boeing 747, you must taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descend and land the aircraft.  Again, the process is much the same….but one major difference is in the speed at which you accomplish these tasks.  It’s easier to learn the basics in a slower and more forgiving aircraft like the default Cessna 172.  But certainly as you master these tasks in the Cessna it really is just a matter of applying the same principles as you progress to larger and more complex aircraft.

I know there are some (perhaps many) who have no desire to fly the heavy jets.  Likewise, many of you once you get the hang of flying may never fly anything smaller than a Boeing 737.  This is of course the beauty of our hobby.  There truly is something for everyone.

At some point if you want to try to fly the heavy jet aircraft, I would suggest you start with the default Boeing 737.  The Boeing 737 has been a featured default aircraft of Microsoft Flight Simulator since FS95 and is an easy aircraft to learn.

Tip – When starting to learn how to fly the heavies, stick with the default aircraft.  While these default aircraft models may lack the sophistication of their real world counterpart, the up side in learning is that they lack the sophistication of their real world counterpart.  Said another way, the default aircraft modeled in Flight Simulator are more forgiving and much easier to fly than the study-level, payware models such as PMDG.

Much as I did in the article titled “Your First Flight”, I suggest you load up the default Boeing 737 and head out to KEDW (Edwards Air Force Base).  Our goal is to spend time getting to know the flight characteristics and differences of the Boeing 737 (compared to the Cessna).  I highly suggest following the same steps of concentrating on taxi, takeoff, climb and cruise at first.  As you’ll quickly get the hang of that (since you’ve been practicing and mastering the Cessna), then add the descent and landing phase.  Just follow the pattern shown in the image below until you get it right.

Until next time…

Happy Flying!!!

JT

Your First Flight

A few weeks ago I shared with you all the choices you have available in the form of flight simulation software.  While you certainly have many options, the majority of my experience and what I will discuss throughout these tutorials will be how it all relates back to Microsoft Flight Simulator/Prepar3D.  Regardless of your choice, once you get it installed the next step is to take that first flight.

While it may be tempting to load up the default Boeing 747 and depart from KJFK in New York and fly to London Heathrow.  If this is your first time in a computer flight simulator, please allow me to provide some advice and encourage you to wait a little while before you jump into the big jets.

Remember, a normal aircraft flight includes several parts of flight including taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descent and landing.  Each of these parts do require a certain amount of practice and they are the same regardless of aircraft type.  Practice really does make perfect.

Tip – You may have read previous articles on my blog about flying for virtual airlines and flying online with other pilots and controllers on the VATSIM or IVAO Networks.  These are both fun aspects which can and will add additional layers of realism to your flight simulation experience.  However, please wait until you have sufficient experience before pursuing as VA’s and the online networks require you to have the necessary skills to operate aircraft in all aspects of flight (taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descent and landing).

In addition to the Microsoft Flight Simulator flight tutorials which will help you tremendously, load up a flight in the default Cessna 172 Skyhawk from KEDW (Andrews Air Force Base, California).  I suggest this location as the runways are wide and long.  Consider turning off the options for other traffic and set the weather to imitate a clear, calm day and just spend time practicing and maneuvering your Cessna 172 both on the ground and in the air.

Depart the active runway and practice hand-flying the aircraft at first. Practice maintaining your speed, altitude and direction.  Don’t worry about landing the aircraft at this time.  Remember this is just a simulator and nothing bad will happen if you crash a few times.  As you spend more time practicing your take-off maneuvers, you’ll get the hang of properly trimming out the aircraft where it will fly straight and level with minimum input from the controls.

Tip – While the aircrafts autopilot functionality can certainly assist in controlling the aircrafts direction, altitude, etc…these tasks should also be understood and practiced without the need of relying on the aircraft autopilot.

Once you can successfully taxi to the active runway, takeoff, climb and cruise you really only have two elements of flight to master and that is descent and landing.  Again, using your default Cessna 172 at KEDW, practice landing maneuvers using the diagram below.  Depart KEDW and fly a runway heading while climbing a few hundred feet.  Practice turning on the crosswind leg, then again on the downwind leg (parallel to the active runway), then the base leg and then final approach.   Don’t worry about descending and landing.  Just practice this important maneuver and make sure you can correctly line up with the runway each time.

After you can demonstrate flying this pattern and being successful at lining up to the runway on final approach, then introduce descent and practice “touch-and-go” landing maneuvers.  Again, KEDW is a perfect facility to practice this with runway 04R/22L being a long 15,024 feet in length (2.84 miles).

Tip – Remember “Pitch for Speed, Throttle for Altitude”.  Trim your aircraft for the desired speed you want.  Need to descend? Simply reduce power.  Need to climb?  Increase throttle/power and the aircraft will climb.

As you complete one after another successful “touch-and-go” landings, try to eventually land in the touchdown zone and centered on the runway.  Practice will make this become perfect in time.

File:RunwayDiagram.png

I can’t tell you how many hours it will take to master the maneuvers I’ve discussed here today.  You should spend adequate time practicing until you feel comfortable.  But I can tell you that in time it will eventually become second nature.  As you get better and better controlling the Cessna then work your way up.  Before you know it, you’ll be the PIC (Pilot In Command) of a Boeing 747 headed from KJFK to EGLL.

Until next time…

Happy Flying!!!

JT

Fine Print:  Unfortunately I feel the need to state for the record that my “How To” articles and tips are for flight simulation purposes only and should not be used for real world aviation.

Must Have Hardware Items for Flight Simulation

A few days ago I reviewed all the various options you have in choosing a flight simulation application.  I covered everything back to FSX and everything forward to Dovetail Games Flight Sim World, X-Plane and my favorite Prepar3D.

While some simulation game titles such as Truck Sim, Farm Sim etc. can be played with just a mouse and keyboard or even a slight upgrade to an X-Box style controller, the same really can’t be said for flight simulation.  Yes, you can certainly fly only with the keyboard and mouse, but I’m confident that you’ll find learning to fly much, much easier with a good joystick setup.  For me, flight simulation is more than just flying from point A to point B.  It’s the extra level of immersion which a good set of controls provide and the ability to improve my virtual flying skills with each and every flight.

If you are going to spend your hard earned money on a new flight sim application, then consider spending a little bit more and purchasing a good joystick.  From my early days with the Commodore 64 all the way up until approx. the late 90’s or early 2000 timeframe, that is all I used was a joystick.  A very good joystick at a reasonable price is the Logitech Extreme 3D Pro Joystick.  Amazon currently lists this joystick at $34.99.  The 3D Pro might be considered entry level today, but that hasn’t always been the case.  When I purchased my first 3D Pro (just a few years ago) it was over $100 and it also works well with Farm Sim.  The joystick will do everything you need it to do from controlling throttle, rudder, ailerons and offers buttons which can be easily programmed to control flaps, landing gear etc.

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Of course, just like with everything else…there are many different options you have in the joystick department.  If you are looking for something a little more advanced then look into the CH Products Flight Sim Yoke and add the CH Products Pro Pedals for ultimate rudder control and precision landings.  The Yoke sells on Amazon for around $130 and the pedals for about $120.  The yoke offers a built in throttle, prop and mixture controls along with toggle buttons for flaps and gear.  Additional thumb control buttons can be programmed to suit your needs.  I’ve had my CH Products Yoke for well over 15 years and last year I replaced my pedals which had stopped working after about 12 years.

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The CH Products Pedals can certainly be added at a later time.

 

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You still have many other cool hardware accessory items you can add to increase your level of realism and fun.  I’ll cover more of these in a later article.  The purpose of this posting is to provide you with a few examples to get you thinking.  I own and use these items in my setup and can tell you that if you take care of them, they’ll provide years of flight sim fun.

Until next time…

Happy Flying!!!

Jerry

Why Flight Simulation?

A little over 5 years ago I wrote a series of blog postings from a “How To” perspective with regards to the exciting hobby of flight simulation.  While some things have changed, some things haven’t.  Over the next few weeks I plan to re-release these articles, but will tweak and update the information so it’s more applicable today.  After all, a lot has changed over the past 5+ years.  For todays installment, I’m going to discuss Why Flight Simulation?

To some individuals, a computer based flight simulator is just a game and to many others it is much more, it’s an important hobby.  I’ve even known many younger individuals who were inspired to pursue aviation careers and became pilots and air traffic controllers as a result.  Regardless of your motive, one can learn and experience many different aspects of aviation and even learn something about geography through a computer based flight simulator program.

For me, flight simulation changed from being “Just a Game” around the year 2000.  As it was around this timeframe when I was first introduced to the world of internet based virtual airlines or VA’s.  I’ll discuss VA’s in more depth in a future article.  Before 2000, I would load up a flight in my simulator, pick a destination, take off and come back in a hour or two and land the plane.  I was happy if I could land within a hundred miles or so of the airport.  However,  with a little practice (practice does make perfect after all), I could navigate my aircraft and found it was actually interesting to fly the aircraft versus letting the autopilot do it.

Tip – It is easy to get caught up in wanting to fly “Big Iron” aircraft like the Boeing 747.  However, you’ll learn more about flying and navigating when spending time in the default Cessna type aircraft which are featured in all versions of the popular flight simulator programs.  Work your way up from the single engine prop models just like real pilots.

While I have no desire to take flying lessons or earn my private pilots license, the flight simulation hobby has taught me much about aviation, about the world we live in and I’ve met some really wonderful people as a result.

Next time I’ll discuss what flight simulator software is right for you (there are many to choose from) and some tips on setting it up.  Thank you for reading my blog.

Until next time…

Happy Flying!!!

JT

Fine Print:  Unfortunately I feel the need to state for the record that my “How To” articles and tips are for flight simulation purposes only and should not be used for real world aviation.

FS15 How To–Setup Logitech G27 & Extreme 3D Pro Joystick

I’ve been searching for a way to enable BOTH my Logitech G27 wheel/pedal/shifter unit AND my Logitech Extreme 3D Pro Joystick in Farming Simulator 15.  I’ve worn Google out and have read through many forums.  I’ve also watched several YouTube videos.  Unfortunately, much of the information available is either in a non-English language or more geared towards FS13.  Some videos and forum threads discuss the need to edit the inputBinding.xml file and some even mention the need to install 3rd party software.  I’ve also read through so many comments from fellow FS15 enthusiasts who are so frustrated and fed up, that they just gave up on trying to get it all to work.

Let’s face it.  Giants SHOULD have done a better job implementing wheel support in FS15.  Simply put…I believe they dropped the ball.  If you are going to develop a driving based game and call it a simulator…YOU NEED TO OFFER WHEEL SUPPORT.  Yes, FS15 can be controlled via the keyboard or a simple XBox type controller.  Some folks are 100% happy with this setup.  However, if you want to take this game to the max and truly push the limits…(and feel good about calling it a simulator) then offer better wheel support like is offered in Euro Truck Simulator 2 or American Truck Simulator.

Now that we’ve got that all out of the way, I absolutely love Farming Simulator 15.  While I play a variety of simulation based games like the previously mentioned ATS/ETS2…I also enjoy Car Mechanic Simulator 2015, Train Simulator 16 and Flight Simulation (P3D).  At the present time I would have to say that Farming Simulator 15 is my favorite.  I believe it is my favorite because there is so much variety in the game play.  FS15 allows us to operate tractors, combines, front loaders, bale hay, manage livestock and of course chop trees down in forestry.

The operation of most vehicles in FS15 is pretty straight forward with the G27.  Press the gas pedal and the vehicle goes forward, turn the steering wheel and it turns.  However, the operation of other functions not so much.  For example, if you are operating the telehandler or the wheel loader…the operation of the front bucket is a little clumsy with the mouse.  Actually it can be downright frustrating.  Considering one spends good money on the G27, the need to use the mouse or keyboard to operate the front bucket really blows away the immersion you are attempting to achieve.

Most know the forestry aspect of Farming Simulator 15 is a very good way to generate a lot of money when first starting out on a new map.  But operating the crane to pickup logs to load the trailer with the mouse or keyboard is just as frustrating as I previously described.  Perhaps more so.

In the real world, these equipment functions are managed by pulling a lever or two and in some cases using a joystick (or two).  I purchase the Logitech Extreme 3D Pro joystick over a year ago in an effort to use it for handling the functions of operating the front bucket or grabbing logs.  Unfortunately I just couldn’t get it to work alongside my G27…..UNTIL NOW!!!

As I mentioned at the top of this piece, I’ve searched, I’ve watched and I’ve read in an effort to make this work.  I’ve started threads on many of the popular FS15 forums asking for assistance…and basically heard nothing but crickets.  So in an effort to assist others who may find themselves in my situation…I’ve decided to document what I did to get both my Logitech G27 and Extreme 3D Pro Joystick to work in Farming Simulator 15.

The video below is just a little over 12 minutes long.  In this span of time I demonstrate what I did to get my hardware working.  During this video I setup the basic assignments for the wheel, pedals and joystick.  Both the G27 and the joystick unit offer many buttons which can be programmed in the same manner I demonstrate in the video.  You just need to decide what you want programmed.

Thank you for watching this video.  It is my desire to help as many people as possible.  Please share!  Also please visit my blog site Planes, Trains & Automobiles (and Farming Too!) for more helpful how-to articles, mod reviews and other simulation adventures.  You may also Follow Me on Twitter.

Until next time…

Happy Farming (with a Joystick)

Jerry

Your First Flight

A few weeks ago I shared with you all the choices you have available in the form of flight simulation software.  I take it you’ve settled on one and have successfully installed the software onto your computer.  Unfortunately, most of what I will blog about will directly relate to Microsoft Flight Simulator.  As I have stated in previous articles, both FSX (released in 2006) and even FS9 (Flight Simulator 2004 released in 2003) are used by many flight simulator enthusiasts today.  Add-ons in the form of both software (scenery, aircraft etc.) are still developed and hardware developers for the most part still support both the old FS9 and FSX platforms.  Regardless of the decision you made on flight simulation software, once you get it installed the next step is to take that first flight. 

While it may be tempting to load up the default Boeing 747 and depart from KJFK in New York and fly to London Heathrow.  If this is your first time in a computer flight simulator, please allow me to provide some advice and encourage you to wait a little while before you jump into the big jets.

Remember, a normal aircraft flight includes several parts of flight including taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descent and landing.  Each of these parts do require a certain amount of practice and they are the same regardless of aircraft type.  Practice really does make perfect. 

Tip – You may have read previous articles on my blog about flying for virtual airlines and flying online with other pilots and controllers on the VATSIM or IVAO Networks.  These are both fun aspects which can and will add additional layers of realism to your flight simulation experience.  However, please wait until you have sufficient experience before pursuing as VA’s and the online networks require you to have the necessary skills to operate aircraft in all aspects of flight (taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descent and landing).

In addition to the Microsoft Flight Simulator flight tutorials which will help you tremendously, load up a flight in the default Cessna 172 Skyhawk from KEDW (Andrews Air Force Base, California).  I suggest this location as the runways are wide and long.  Consider turning off the options for other traffic and set the weather to imitate a clear, calm day and just spend time practicing and maneuvering your Cessna 172 both on the ground and in the air. 

Depart the active runway and practice hand-flying the aircraft at first. Practice maintaining your speed, altitude and direction.  Don’t worry about landing the aircraft at this time.  Remember this is just a simulator and nothing bad will happen if you crash a few times.  As you spend more time practicing your take-off maneuvers, you’ll get the hang of properly trimming out the aircraft where it will fly straight and level with minimum input from the controls.  

Tip – While the aircrafts autopilot functionality can certainly assist in controlling the aircrafts direction, altitude, etc…these tasks should also be understood and practiced without the need of relying on the aircraft autopilot.

Once you can successfully taxi to the active runway, takeoff, climb and cruise you really only have two elements of flight to master and that is descent and landing.  Again, using your default Cessna 172 at KEDW, practice landing maneuvers using the diagram below.  Depart KEDW and fly a runway heading while climbing a few hundred feet.  Practice turning on the crosswind leg, then again on the downwind leg (parallel to the active runway), then the base leg and then final approach.   Don’t worry about descending and landing.  Just practice this important maneuver and make sure you can correctly line up with the runway each time. 

After you can demonstrate flying this pattern and being successful at lining up to the runway on final approach, then introduce descent and practice “touch-and-go” landing maneuvers.  Again, KEDW is a perfect facility to practice this with runway 04R/22L being a long 15,024 feet in length (2.84 miles). 

As you complete one after another successful “touch-and-go” landings, try to eventually land in the touchdown zone and centered on the runway.  Practice will make this become perfect in time.

File:RunwayDiagram.png

I can’t tell you how many hours it will take to master the maneuvers I’ve discussed here today.  You should spend adequate time practicing until you feel comfortable.  But I can tell you that in time it will eventually become second nature.  As you get better and better controlling the Cessna then work your way up.  Before you know it, you’ll be the PIC (Pilot In Command) of a Boeing 747 headed from KJFK to EGLL.

Until next time…

Happy Flying!!!

JT

 

Fine Print:  Unfortunately I feel the need to state for the record that my “How To” articles and tips are for flight simulation purposes only and should not be used for real world aviation.

Which Flight Simulator Software is right for me?

Back in the early days, we didn’t have much choice when it came to selecting flight simulator software.  When I was a teen back in the early 80’s, I had a Commodore 64 computer.  I had a version of flight simulator which ran on the Commodore 64 computer.  In those days you only had a small selection of airports to fly to and from and typically only one type of aircraft.  I spent many, many hours flying the Cessna around Meig’s Field in Chicago.

As time passed, the sophistication of the various flight simulator software titles evolved from just one aircraft and a few airports to any aircraft one could imagine and an entire globe full of airports with tons of eye candy to look at while flying from point A to point B.  Today, flight simulator enthusiasts have many different software platforms to choose from when it comes to setting up their flight simulator. 

Microsoft Flight Simulator

Perhaps some will argue this point, but I believe Microsoft Flight Simulator leads the popularity contest when it comes to flight simulator software.   From Microsoft Flight Simulator 1.0 released in 1982 all the way to Microsoft Flight Simulator X released in 2006, Microsoft has certainly done its part to create the industry behind the flight sim hobby.

Tip – Microsoft released a new ‘simulator’ titled Microsoft Flight in February 2012.  While Microsoft referred to MS Flight as a simulator, the flight sim community does not.  Unlike all other versions of Microsoft Flight Simulator, Flight is geared to be more of a ‘game’ versus simulator. On July 26, 2012, Microsoft cancelled any further development plans for Flight.

If you are looking into purchasing a version of Microsoft Flight Simulator, you’ll find Flight Simulator 2004 (AKA FS9) and Flight Simulator X as the most common versions used among Microsoft enthusiasts.  You’ll also find software add-on options (including scenery, aircraft and other accessories) widely available for both FS9 and FSX versions of Microsoft Flight Simulator.  I wouldn’t advise purchasing any version prior to FS9.

FSX will function (as well as just about every add-on) without issue on the Microsoft Windows 7 OS (32 bit and 64 bit).  I’ve also read in various forums where users have installed FSX on the new Microsoft Windows 8 OS.  However, I can’t confirm Windows 8 will handle all the other add-on options available. 

X-Plane

X-Plane, developed by Laminar Research is another popular flight sim platform which has been around for a number of years.  Designed for Mac, but also available for 32/64-Bit Windows and Linux OS systems, it has become a solid alternative to the Microsoft brand.  Most 3rd party developers designing the various add-on options include X-Plane versions.  Unlike Microsoft, the developers of X-Plane continue to develop the software and as of the present time the most current version is 10.10.

Prepar3D

Prepar3D or P3D is the new kid on the block with regards to payware flight simulation software.  Announced in 2009, Lockheed Martin negotiated the purchase of the intellectual property including source code of Microsoft Flight Simulator X along with the hiring of many of the MS developers which were part of ACES Studios to develop what would become Prepar3D.  From what I understand, most add-ons as well as the default FSX aircraft work in Prepar3D without any adjustment since Prepar3D is kept backward compatible to FSX.  However, there are some small technical changes that must be made if you want to fly online via either the IVAO or VATSIM networks.

There is some debate whether or not Prepar3D is designed to be used in the flight sim hobby community.  I don’t believe Lockheed Martin plans to develop a public version, but the Prepar3D website does state that the academic license version is available for students from kindergarten through undergraduate and is suitable for home use.  You can learn more about the licensing of P3D here.

Freeware/Open-Source Alternatives and a warning

There is an open-source alternative to flight simulation software available from FlightGear.  While I’ve never spent any time testing or flying using the FlightGear flight simulation software, I know others do use it and there are methods of importing planes from Microsoft Flight Simulator into FlightGear.  In addition, there is also an on-line client for the VATSIM network called SquawkGearthat will allow you to use FlightGear to fly on-line.  It is extremely encouraging to see developers like FlightGear contribute to the flight sim community with their open-source program. 

Unfortunately, there are some individuals who have taken the open-source code from FlightGear, made a few minor modifications and are attempting to market the product under various names such as Flight Pro Sim, Pro Flight Simulator etc.  I first learned about this back in 2010 and blogged about it here and here.  But please….don’t take my word for it.  Read the official statement released by FlightGear and judge for yourself.

Final Thoughts

I base much of my decision around what flight simulator platform I continue to use around the fact that I have a large investment of money and time in the Microsoft platform.  I built a custom PCback in 2010 which would handle the demands of Microsoft FSX.  I have hundreds of dollars tied up in add-on software and hardware to enhance my flight sim experience.  If I woke up tomorrow and could no longer run Microsoft FSX, I would probably further investigate Prepar3D as a solution.  However, if you are just starting out….the sky truly is the limit in the direction you proceed. 

While there are many reasons to select Microsoft Flight Simulator as your software of choice, the fact that Microsoft discontinued development and in my opinion will never develop flight simulation software again is perhaps a reason to steer away from this as an option.  But for now, FSX continues to be my platform of choice and it works well for me.

Until next time…

Happy Flying!!!

JT

Flight Simulation–Why?

To some individuals, a computer based flight simulator is just a game and to many others it is much more, it’s an important hobby.  I’ve even known many younger individuals who were inspired to pursue aviation careers and became pilots and air traffic controllers as a result.  Regardless of your motive, one can learn and experience many different aspects of aviation and even learn something about geography through a computer based flight simulator program. 

For me, flight simulation changed from being “Just a Game” around the year 2000.  As it was around this timeframe when I was first introduced to the world of internet based virtual airlines or VA’s.  I’ll discuss VA’s in more depth in a future article.  Before 2000, I would load up a flight in my simulator, pick a destination, take off and come back in a hour or two and land the plane.  I was happy if I could land within a hundred miles or so of the airport.  However,  with a little practice (practice does make perfect after all), I could navigate my aircraft and found it was actually interesting to fly the aircraft versus letting the autopilot do it. 

Tip – It is easy to get caught up in wanting to fly “Big Iron” aircraft like the Boeing 747.  However, you’ll learn more about flying and navigating when spending time in the default Cessna type aircraft which are featured in all versions of the popular flight simulator programs.  Work your way up from the single engine prop models just like real pilots.

While I have no desire to take flying lessons or earn my private pilots license, the flight simulation hobby has taught me much about aviation, about the world we live in and I’ve met some really wonderful people as a result. 

Next time I’ll discuss what flight simulator software is right for you (there are many to choose from) and some tips on setting it up.  Thank you for reading my blog.

Until next time…

Happy Flying!!!

JT

“How To” Page – Introduction

I’ve been flying computer flight simulators since the early to mid 1980’s.  During this over 25 year period of time I’ve learned a lot and I would like to share what I’ve learned with my readers. If you’ve been flying for a while, then perhaps nothing I’ll tell you will be new information.  However, I know our hobby continues to attract new blood and if I can help those through my knowledge, then it is worth the time I’ll spend blogging about these various subjects. 

I’ll “Kick the Tires and Light the Fires” on this content in the coming days.  I have a list of topics to discuss and knowledge to share.  Please bookmark my site or subscribe via RSS to stay current on my content. 

Thank you

JT

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